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“New Mexico’s Union workers filed suit today to invalidate a poorly constructed Sandoval County ordinance designed to disable the ability of New Mexico workers to bargain for fair wages and benefits for their families.
JOIN US. STAND WITH THE WORKING PEOPLE'S DAY OF ACTION. On Saturday, February 24, New Mexico will stand with thousands of working people and our allies as we unite for our freedoms and demand an end to a system and an economy that’s rigged against us by the wealthy and powerful.
Next Week at Roundhouse: An Attack on Local Government Ability to Protect Citizen Well Being, and Right to Work for Less

The Mexican government has filed legislation that would substantially weaken rights for working people. In response, the AFL-CIO filed a complaint alleging that Mexico is violating the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation, the NAFTA labor side deal.

As so-called right to work ordinance passes in Sandoval County and takes center stage at teh U.S. Supreme Court, it's worth a moment to listen in as Mark Harrison breaks out of his usual character and gives voice to a blunt, honest and true wrap up of what the law aims to accomplish. CLICK to WATCH Labor Minute. 

Journalists at the Los Angeles Times have overwhelmingly elected to form a union, a first for the 136-year-old news organization that for much of its history was known for its opposition to organized labor.

The union drive was launched publicly in October and culminated in an election earlier this month. Results, tallied Friday by the National Labor Relations Board, show workers voted 248 to 44 to be represented by the Washington, D.C.-based NewsGuild-Communications Workers of America.

mayhem, dissension, and litigation. New Mexico Attorney General Opinion Determines Planned Vote Illegal...would be expensive legal wild goose chase; ‘the result would be a crazy quilt of regulations’ and Sandoval County businesses, ‘would often be left in a state of considerable uncertainty,’ according to Attorney General Balderas.

The middle class has been on a steady slide for decades. Signs of this slide are all around us: anemic wage growth, historic income inequality, chronic unemployment and underemployment and, not coincidentally, the steady erosion of workers’ freedom to join unions and bargain for fair wages and benefits. At the same time, American households are facing rising costs that far outpace their stagnant wages.

To Washington, D.C. insiders, this month’s budget negotiations are just the latest partisan exercise in a series of manufactured crises that too often result in short-term solutions. But for those who live and work outside of the Beltway bubble, much more is at stake.

What happens in the coming days has the potential to fundamentally shift the balance of power in the workplace. Nothing less than the right to dream, live, work and retire in security is on the table as Congress faces key decisions and deadlines.

All eyes on the Roundhouse as Sandoval Co. Commissioners keep promise to the 1% and vote on their freedom robbing ordinance

Imagine this: It's Sunday morning and you walk into the church you grew up attending. You have not been to service in a few years. For most of that time, you worked the night shift as an emergency-room nurse and the occasional weekends you had off were filled with sick children, aging parents and digging out from snowstorms. But you are there now. The usher asks your name and when you answer, he frowns and says "I'm so sorry, since you haven't exercised your religious freedom in the last six years, I'll have to ask you to leave."